HTP Episode 005 – Toy and Action Figure Museum with Kevin Stark

toymuseum


Kevin Stark is the curator of the Toy and Action Figure Museum in Pauls Valley, OK. Since 2005, the museum has served as a beacon for toy fanatics and a wealth of knowledge for people unfamiliar with the hobby. Staffed with friendly, passionate fans, the museum has detailed exhibits for the diehard collector, fun displays for the curious tourist, and a play area for the kids. Because, after all, toys are MADE for them, first and foremost!



Here’s where you can keep tabs on all the fun stuff going on at the museum:

Facebook, Twitter, Museum Website


Catch this episode on: YouTubeiTunesSoundcloudStitcherPodbeanRSS Feed

Advertisements

HTP Episode 004 – Jackey Raye Neyman Jones

59630672_872470959768732_4578783747146514432_n


Jackey Raye Neyman Jones portrayed Debbie, the young girl in Manos: The Hands of Fate, a film known to history as one of the worst movies ever made and a cornerstone of Mystery Science Theater 3000 lore. In recent years, Jackey has done an amazing job telling the story of the movie’s bizarre production with her book, Growing Up with Manos, as well as describing the challenges in her personal life through her art and blogs. In May of 2019, she announced her new web series, Manos: The Debbie Chronicles.



Be sure to follow Jackey at the following sites:

Facebook (Jackey Raye Neyman Jones), Facebook (Manos: The Debbie Chronicles), Twitter, Jackey’s Arts


Catch this episode on: YouTubeiTunesSoundcloudStitcherPodbeanRSS Feed

HTP Episode 003 – Catherine Sutherland

teamkittykat


Catherine Sutherland is best known for her role as the Pink Ranger on the Power Rangers TV series. In recent years, she has become a favorite at scifi conventions and is active in many charities such as The Bumblebee Foundation, Love Your Melon, and Metavivor. Her first book, The Boy With the Heart on His Sleeve, is due in early 2019.



Be sure to follow #TeamKittyKat at the following sites:
Facebook, Twitter, www.catherinesutherland.biz/, and Instagram


Catch this episode on: YouTubeiTunesSoundcloudStitcherPodbeanRSS Feed

HTP Episode 002 – Klingon Pop Warrior

Podcast001

Jenbom, the Klingon Pop Warrior, is a YouTube artist and favorite in the Star Trek fan community. In this episode, we discuss her character, the history of the Klingon Pop Warrior project, and how she’s turned a quick gag on the Improvised Star Trek Podcast into a way to raise money for the charity Extra Life.



Be sure to follow Jen at the following sites:
Facebook, Twitter, Bandcamp, klingonpopwarrior.com, and Extra Life


Catch this episode on: YouTubeiTunesSoundcloudStitcherPodbeanRSS Feed

HTP Episode 001 – Jerry Bennett

Podcast001


Jerry Bennett is one of the best comic illustrators in Oklahoma and one of the most popular convention guests at conventions across the country. Jerry and I catch up and spend time talking about comic fandom, Batman, Star Trek, and how Oklahoma makes it easy to enjoy it all. During the discussion, I struggled to remember the name of a comic expert from Oklahoma, who ended up being E. Nelson Bridwell. Bridwell’s works can be read in the compilation bookSuper Friends: Saturday Morning Comics Vol. 1 . Be sure to catch up with Jerry at the following sites:
Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Etsy, and TeePublic


Catch this episode on: YouTubeiTunesSoundcloudStitcherPodbeanRSS Feed

Raise the Bar on Repros

If you’re a fan of the NES and SNES eras of gaming, we’re living in a New Golden Age.  Not only do we have the ability to get any games we may have wanted back in the day, but there are new games being made on a regular basis.  As if that weren’t enough, prototypes of previously unreleased games are now circulating, so you can play games that might have been best-sellers, but were almost lost to the pages of history.  And the best part of all of this is, you can take these games and play them on your original system, just like you always have.

The problem is, when fans put games into actual cartridges, it has usually meant destroying an existing game that had a compatible board.  Sometimes the donor game is an incredibly common title, on occasion it has to be a rarer game.  It’s unfortunate, but it’s been seen as a necessary evil if you want to play something like Earthbound or Legend of Zelda: Outlands on your NES.

I own a few of these games, and I’m glad that I do, as I’ve had hours of fun with them.  However, I think it’s time to say this:  we need to stop destroying old games to make new ones.  What we gain is no longer outweighed by what we lose.

The following video, from the #CUPodcast, sums up my feelings nicely:

In short, cutting up old games to make new ones was reasonable when that was the only way to do the job.  However, in 2016, we now have flashcarts  and reproduction NES boards and cartridge shells.   It’s now entirely possible to get that ROM onto your NES without ever harming an old game, so let’s stop doing it.

Why, you ask?  What’s the harm?  Aren’t there a bajillion NES carts out there, and lots of them made in the hundreds of thousands?  Well, yes, there were.  However, the number may be large, but it’s still finite, and lots of these have already found their way into landfills.  Super Mario Bros./Duck Hunt might be an insanely common game, but taking care of the existing supply will keep it that way, to say nothing of genuinely rare games like Batman: Return of the Joker, another commonly used donor cartridge.

It just boils down to an issue of waste, in my mind.  If you have the ability to play a new game, without destroying an old one, why wouldn’t you?  Isn’t it better to buy an Everdrive than to slice up a rare game?  And if you’re a homebrew developer, wouldn’t it be better to use factory-fresh virginal boards than to re-solder EPROMs onto old carts?  We need to protect the hobby from ourselves.  Gutting donor carts might seem harmless now, but 60 years ago, so did sticking a baseball card into your bike spokes.  Nowadays, lots of enthusiasts mourn the loss of their extra 1955 Sandy Koufax.  Don’t be that guy.

IF YOU ENJOY THIS BLOG, PLEASE CONSIDER SUPPORTING OUR PATREON.

 

 

Networks– Wire It!

If you want the best performance out of your home network, and the best possible streaming for your TV shows, movies, and games, then you really should bypass your wireless access and connect everything with ethernet cables.  But why, WHY would you use those yucky wires, when WiFi is just so easy and cool?

Because, even in the best of circumstances, there’s just more that can go wrong with wireless connections.  Interference, signal drops and even the walls themselves will try to get in the way of your wireless connections, whereas a wired connection works consistently every time.  This is particularly important if your internet connection isn’t that great, or you’re trying to make the most of an inexpensive bandwidth plan.  If you can’t get a better internet connection, get everything you can out of the one you have!

In a previous blog entry, I gave some tips on how to set up your router to keep it out of the way.  Now I’ll give you some tips on how to connect to it via ethernet.  Actually, compared to Wireless, setting up a wired connection is very easy… you just snap a Cat-6 cable into your device, and then into your router, and you’re done.  The only real problem is in making sure you don’t get ripped off buying the cables.

Don’t buy ethernet cables at places like Best Buy, Wal-Mart, or Target.  These things are sold at huge markups there.

Instead, do your shopping online.  What you need depends on how far your device is from your router, and remember to err on the side of length, so you can snake the cable around things if need be.  5-Foot cables are good for connecting devices nearby, 6-inch cables are good for connecting devices sitting on top of each other (great for connecting a modem to a router, for example), and 25-foot cables will do the job if the device is on the other end of the room.

Suppose you’re sold on the need to hard-wire everything, but still don’t want to deal with the cable mess, or your router is in a completely different part of the house?  Well, then what you’d want to do is actually install an ethernet wall jack.  Run the cable from Point A to Point B, fish it through the wall (or ceiling or floor) and slap a plate on it.  It looks really pretty when it’s all done, and then you just plug your device into the wall the way you used to connect a landline phone.

 

Things You’ll Need:

…notice that you can get everything on that list for well under $200.  If it’s a small project, you can probably score all this for under $150.  This does NOT have to be an expensive project!

Really, all you’re doing here is cutting open the cable, pushing the strands into the appropriately-colored pins, and then trimming them with the razor blade.  If you need some extra guidance, try this tutorial, or for the visual people, try the following video:

 

 

OY THIS BLOG, PLEASE CONSIDER SUPPORTING OUR PATREON.