HTP Episode 019 – Chris “Sampo” Cornell


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Chris Cornell, known to the internet as “Sampo,” has been one of the key webmasters for MST3k since websites were still new and different. In this episode, Sampo and I share stories of how fandom has grown since the birth of the modren internet, and how passion for a show can lead you to being involved in the show itself.


Here’s where you can check out Sampo’s legacy:

Twitter, Satellite News



Geek Resource: Satellite News – The site we’ve been talking about all through the episode!


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HTP Episode 018 – Ian Ferguson


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Ian Ferguson is one of the hosts of the Completely Unnecessary Podcast, where he and his co-host Pat Contri analyze retro games, modern games, pop culture trends, and shaving with ranch dressing. More recently, Ian has started working with another team on a project called Yokoi Kids, celebrating the legacy of the Nintendo Game Boy. In addition to that, his new podcast Extra Napkins explores food and food culture. Our talk about all these projects was a lot of fun and I wish we’d had more time.


Here’s where you can check out Ian’s many projects:



Geek Resource: AtariAge – AtariAge is basically the living, breathing embodiment of the classic era of video games. Also, not a bad place to go to talk about modern games.


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HTP Episode 017 – Rebecca Hanson


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Rebecca Hanson is an actor and writer on Mystery Science Theater 3000. She portrays the character Synthia as well as being the voice of Gypsy. In this episode of Hungry Trilobyte, we discuss what it’s like to be a fan of a show and then have the chance to work on it, as well as different comedy styles and creative processes. Lots of good stories about her other MST3K cast-mates!


Here’s where you can check out Rebecca’s work:

Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter, Official Site



Geek Resource: The Annotated MST – line-by-line explanation of MST3k jokes, sorted by episode.


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HTP Episode 016 – Laurie Ulster


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Laurie Ulster was the Supervising producer for After Trek, and in addition, is a witty commentator and writer of many blogs and articles. In this episode, we discuss her experiences getting to step into fandom and appreciate genuinely good people working in Hollywood. During the episode, she misses the name of the host of The Math of Khan, which was James Grime.


Here’s where you can check out Laurie’s work:

Hello Movies Podcast, Pressfolios, Twitter, Trekmovie,


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HTP Episode 015 – Rob Flanagan

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Rob Flanagan is a veteran podcaster, with shows such as Popping the Cherrywood and Shitty Movie Night under his belt. The two of us spend a lot of time discussing the philosophy of podcasting, the fun of toy collecting as adults, and reviving old properties such as He-Man, G.I. Joe, and Transformers. Rob was recently named the Fusion “Fan of the Month“, and is really passionate about the growth of e-sports.


Here’s where you can check out Rob’s work:

Popping the Cherrywood Official Site, Twitter


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HTP Episode 002 – Klingon Pop Warrior

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Jenbom, the Klingon Pop Warrior, is a YouTube artist and favorite in the Star Trek fan community. In this episode, we discuss her character, the history of the Klingon Pop Warrior project, and how she’s turned a quick gag on the Improvised Star Trek Podcast into a way to raise money for the charity Extra Life.



Be sure to follow Jen at the following sites:
Facebook, Twitter, Bandcamp, klingonpopwarrior.com, and Extra Life


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Raise the Bar on Repros

If you’re a fan of the NES and SNES eras of gaming, we’re living in a New Golden Age.  Not only do we have the ability to get any games we may have wanted back in the day, but there are new games being made on a regular basis.  As if that weren’t enough, prototypes of previously unreleased games are now circulating, so you can play games that might have been best-sellers, but were almost lost to the pages of history.  And the best part of all of this is, you can take these games and play them on your original system, just like you always have.

The problem is, when fans put games into actual cartridges, it has usually meant destroying an existing game that had a compatible board.  Sometimes the donor game is an incredibly common title, on occasion it has to be a rarer game.  It’s unfortunate, but it’s been seen as a necessary evil if you want to play something like Earthbound or Legend of Zelda: Outlands on your NES.

I own a few of these games, and I’m glad that I do, as I’ve had hours of fun with them.  However, I think it’s time to say this:  we need to stop destroying old games to make new ones.  What we gain is no longer outweighed by what we lose.

The following video, from the #CUPodcast, sums up my feelings nicely:

In short, cutting up old games to make new ones was reasonable when that was the only way to do the job.  However, in 2016, we now have flashcarts  and reproduction NES boards and cartridge shells.   It’s now entirely possible to get that ROM onto your NES without ever harming an old game, so let’s stop doing it.

Why, you ask?  What’s the harm?  Aren’t there a bajillion NES carts out there, and lots of them made in the hundreds of thousands?  Well, yes, there were.  However, the number may be large, but it’s still finite, and lots of these have already found their way into landfills.  Super Mario Bros./Duck Hunt might be an insanely common game, but taking care of the existing supply will keep it that way, to say nothing of genuinely rare games like Batman: Return of the Joker, another commonly used donor cartridge.

It just boils down to an issue of waste, in my mind.  If you have the ability to play a new game, without destroying an old one, why wouldn’t you?  Isn’t it better to buy an Everdrive than to slice up a rare game?  And if you’re a homebrew developer, wouldn’t it be better to use factory-fresh virginal boards than to re-solder EPROMs onto old carts?  We need to protect the hobby from ourselves.  Gutting donor carts might seem harmless now, but 60 years ago, so did sticking a baseball card into your bike spokes.  Nowadays, lots of enthusiasts mourn the loss of their extra 1955 Sandy Koufax.  Don’t be that guy.

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