HTP Episode 087 – Deana Dolphin Returns!

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“Captain” Deana Dolphin comes back to Hungry Trilobyte (after first appearing in Episode 23) and is eager to report on the #MakeMoreMST3K Kickstarter campaign!  Yes, MST3K finally has its Season 13 on the horizon, and the fans have a chance to make this more than just a show running on a network.  Joel has decided to build “The Gizmoplex” and create a streaming service that’ll cater to MST3K fans, as well as provide us all with some amazing new resources.

In this episode, we speculate on what sort of features Joel could add to the Gizmoplex, and try and compare how this reflects on the power of the fandom now, compared to the way it was when the show ended after Season 7.  And 10.  And 12.

Be sure to check out the Kickstarter HERE and support new MST3K!

Here’s where you can find Deana: Twitter, Instagram, Reddit

Deana’s Facebook page is open to new fans, and you can check the notes for Episode 23 for a list of groups she moderates.

Catch this episode on: YouTubeApple – Spotify – SoundcloudStitcherAudibleRSS Feed

Podcast logo by MarcieLondon.com – @MarcieStarfleet on Twitter and Instagram

HTP Episode 070 – Klingon Pop Warrior Returns!

 

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JenBom, the Klingon Pop Warrior, joined us for the SECOND episode of Hungry Trilobyte, and has returned for Episode 70! Now she has returned to talk about her new album, on Kickstarter during January of 2021.

We also get a chance to talk about streaming (both with and without Klingon ridges) as well as Season 3 of Discovery.

The Kickstarter for the third album can be found here.  The adventures of JenBom can be found on her official website, her Facebook and Twitter, and her Twitch channel.  These slapping Klingon tunes can be found on Bandcamp!

 

Catch this episode on: YouTubeApple – Spotify – SoundcloudStitcherAmazonRSS Feed

Podcast logo by MarcieLondon.com – @MarcieStarfleet on Twitter and Instagram

HTP Episode 057 – Mike James, “UKMike”

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Mike James aka UKMike, is the author of the upcoming book, ‘Smoke and Mirrors: The Rise and Fall of a Serial Antipreneur”. The book is a dissection of the Coleco Chameleon farce of 2015, when hobbyist Mike Kennedy attempted to bluff his way into a $2 million Kickstarter for a new game console, despite having no skills, technology, or (quite frankly) common sense. Mike and I give a basic history of the story for the benefit of newcomers, and share some of our personal opinions of when the story went from bad to worse.

Smoke and Mirrors has its own website, and the Kickstarter page is here.  Follow the Twitter account to check the progress of the new saga!

If you’d like to read about the scandal in real-time, back from the original sources, you can follow the original announcement thread on AtariAge.  Don’t forget the follow-up thread about the Coleco Chameleon.

UKMike is a regular on the Retro Gaming Roundup Podcast.

Catch this episode on: YouTubeiTunesSoundcloudStitcherPodbeanRSS Feed

HTP Episode 023 – “Captain” Deana Dolphin


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Deana Dolphin, MST3K’s “Fan Ambassador” has become a champion for the show and for getting MSTies around the world together– both online and in real life. Hosting watch parties, live events, and meet-ups, Deana reaches out to fans everywhere. In this episode, she and I talk about her adventures in the fan community, visiting the MST3k set, and her love of Agonywolf Media. Currently, she’s trying to organize the 5th Annual Turkey Day MSTie Meet Up.

Here’s where you can find Deana: Twitter, Instagram, Reddit

Deana’s Facebook page is open to new fans, and here are the groups she admins or in which she’s an active member:

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Mystery Singles Theater 3000

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Watch Together Group

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Postcard Exchange Group

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Secret Santa Group

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MSTies & More Group

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RiffTrax Group

Deana also supports MSTie Minute, another great collection of fans, and you can find them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Catch this episode on: YouTubeiTunesSoundcloudStitcherPodbeanRSS Feed

Kickstarting Common Sense

I’m a big fan of Kickstarter and other crowdfunding services, but I think it’s time the internet started to enforce some real-world economics on the idea.  Yes, raising a five-figure sum to make potato salad is a great story, but that’s not a sustainable event.  Too many people see crowdfunding as an internet-powered money machine.  Here are some lessons Kickstarter wannabes have to learn, from a backer’s point of view:

  • If you’re making a product, my pledge should allow me to buy that product.  Asking me for $50 with the promise that one day, I’ll have the opportunity to give you even more money doesn’t fly.
  • Downloads are all well and good, but they will always inherently have less value than a physical item.  In money terms, CDs are worth more than mp3s, BluRays are worth more than mp4s, and books are worth more than PDFs.  You can run your trap all you want about “the all-digital future”, I’m not giving you $100 for a download.  Offer me a real product for a reasonable price.
  • If you take my money, I do expect you to deliver.  Kickstarter might have a hands-off approach to dead-end projects, but I don’t have a hands-off approach to my money.  If your project is funded, you better deliver.  That said, I think Kickstarter needs some form of “return policy” for projects that go so far past their target date with no results.
  • That said, I think most people get that delays DO happen.  When they do, you NEED to communicate.  Tell people what’s going wrong, and why.  I can think of a number of high-profile projects that “go dark” when things get tough, and the backers are convinced it’s a scam.  Remember, they are both your customers and your investors… you owe them.
  • Finally, and arguably most importantly, don’t go to Kickstarter until you absolutely have to.  Wait until you’re at the point in your project when you absolutely cannot do one more thing until you get money.  If you’re inventing something, have a pre-production prototype ready.  If you’re writing something, have your final draft ready.  Video games should be coded and in the late debugging stages.  If the product is done before anyone knows about it, most of the previous complaints would never have been issues at all.

I can hear a lot of Kickstarter newbies saying “Yeah, but…”  No, I don’t want to hear about the brave new internet world, or that your project is a special snowflake.  Contrary to popular belief, crowdfunding is still bound by basic economics.  You still need to offer something substantial, at a reasonable price, and deliver.